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The Personality Types Most Likely to Succeed in Business

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a psychological test, which distinguishes people by their personality type. The test differentiates four factors: where one focuses their attention – Extrovert (E) vs. Introvert (I); how they absorb information – Sensing (S) vs. Intuition (N); how they make decisions – Thinking (T) vs. Feeling (F); and how they view the world around them – Judging (J) vs. Perception (P). The test asks various multiple-choice questions to place you on one side of each of these dichotomies, resulting in series of four letters which corresponds to one of the sixteen possible personality types.

Every profile has its own strengths and weaknesses in business. Yet, according to a recent research, five in particular are more likely to occupy leadership positions, earn higher incomes, or be self-employed.

ISTJ – The Inspector

ISTJ – The Inspector

ISTJs are thorough, realistic and systematic, typically occupying financial or legal positions. Whether they occupy the higher echelons or not, this personality type is ensures an enterprise is completing tasks efficiently. Their detailed outlook often clashes with the ENTJ’s “big picture” approach, but they will ensure no stone goes unturned when a project necessitates strict requirements.

INTJ – The Mastermind

As the name suggests, masterminds are the leaders that companies rely on to offer innovative and logical solutions. They are achievement-orientated and relish overcoming challenging problems. While they might not always be the most social of workers, this is typically because they are focused on the job at hand. They are demanding, but you can count on them to get the job done.

ENTJ – The CEO

ENTJ-–-The-CEOUnlike the aforementioned inspectors, ENTJs focus almost entirely on the big picture, keen to move a business towards a larger end-goal, rather than worrying about how they will get there. They are driven, decisive and natural leaders. Inefficiency and an inability of others to make decisions can be major stressors, but with the right partner to keep them grounded, ENTJs make ideal managers.

ESTJ – The Supervisor

ESTJs frequently succeed in business because they understand how to interact well with others, know how to organise people and resources, and are willing to make tough decisions. Sometimes their assertiveness might be misinterpreted as being uncaring, but their drive to succeed makes them highly suitable for organising projects that desperately requires structure.

ENTP – The Inventor

ENTP – The InventorENTPs are hugely imaginative and innovative, often seeing solutions to problems no one has thought of yet. They love to play devil’s advocate in any given situation to drive a business into the future, even at the expense of stressing their colleagues around them. Telling an ENTP something cannot be done is as good as commissioning them to solve the problem, but they sometimes need to be reminded to stay in the present and work on a present issue first.

Of course, possessing one of these personality types is no guarantee of career success, nor are you doomed if you happen to have one of the other eleven. Still, not only do they indicate what it takes to succeed in business, but inform you as to the sort of people that will surround you should you achieve high levels of success.

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Dr Prem Jagyasi (c)

Dr Prem is an award winning strategic leader, renowned author, publisher and highly acclaimed global speaker. Aside from publishing a bevy of life improvement guides, Dr Prem runs a network of 50 niche websites that attracts millions of readers across the globe. Thus far, Dr Prem has traveled to more than 40 countries, addressed numerous international conferences and offered his expert training and consultancy services to more than 150 international organizations. He also owns and leads a web services and technology business, supervised and managed by his eminent team. Dr Prem further takes great delight in travel photography.

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