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Tsunami inundated England 400 years ago: Study

the region in 1607 9

Though the modern history recorded the deadliest tsunami of 2004 as the most nerve wrecking and devastating earthquake occurred in the Indian Ocean, sweeping away about 229,866 people, killing 186,983, according to a United nations report, it is not a new episode for United Kingdom, tracing back its ancient history.

According to a new research, tsunami had its cruel lush on coastal England 400 years ago. This is recorded to be the deadliest natural disaster United Kingdom ever experienced.

Causing a flood on January 30, 1607, the massive wave swamped the Bristol Channel in southwestern England. In the process, it submerged more than 190 square miles (500 square kilometers) of land. Not to mention, it killed some 2,000 people, according tot he study.

It was not that the 1607 disaster had not been previously recorded. But, it has been attributed to a freak storm surge, unless authors of the new study confirms it as tsunami taking cues from the region’s geological clues.

But, the finding is no simple reveal of UK’s natural history, but also provides an alarm of another such disaster risk. Not just that! The study says that the next tsunami could be deadlier!

Thus, the importance for a ‘tsunami warning system’ in England has increased.

Photo: nationalgeographic.com

Dr Prem Jagyasi and Team

Dr Prem is an award winning strategic leader, renowned author, publisher and highly acclaimed global speaker. Aside from publishing a bevy of life improvement guides, Dr Prem runs a network of 50 niche websites that attracts millions of readers across the globe. Thus far, Dr Prem has traveled to more than 40 countries, addressed numerous international conferences and offered his expert training and consultancy services to more than 150 international organizations. He also owns and leads a web services and technology business, supervised and managed by his eminent team. Dr Prem further takes great delight in travel photography.

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